Predicates

Definition

A predicate is the completer of a sentence. The subject names the “do-er” or “be-er” of the sentence; the predicate does the rest of the work. It is made up of the verb and object(s) remaining in the sentence so the sentence is complete. Predicates can be both simple and compound.

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Simple Predicates

A simple predicate consists of only a verb, verb string, or compound verb. Consider the examples of each below (verbs in italics):

Verb

The glacier melted.

Verb String

The glacier has been melting.

Compound Verb

The glacier melted, broke apart, and slipped into the sea.

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Compound Predicates

A compound predicate consists of two (or more) such predicates connected:

  • The glacier began to slip down the mountainside and eventually crushed some of the village’s outlying buildings.

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Exercises

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